Al Jolson Home Page|Video Podcasts

The International
Al Jolson Society

Video Podcasts

Every week, enjoy a podcast based on the radio show posted on the Jolson website from a corresponding week in the past. Containing excerpts from the program and photographic stills that suggest the content, they present a unique way to enjoy these radio shows starring Al Jolson. On this page you will find links to the podcasts that have been posted, and watch the weekly Jolson Update Email for news of new presentations. As of this week, there are 68 podcasts online.

All of these podcasts are excerpted from radio shows and broadcasts that are available to members of the International Al Jolson Society through the Audio Department. If you are not yet a member of the Society, click to JOIN us and enjoy all that we have to offer!

   
This is an excerpt of the 08 Apr 1947 Bob Hope Program with guest star Al Jolson. This clip from the 30 minute show includes Jolie's introduction and ovation, "California, Here I Come," and comedy between Jolson and Hope. It is illustrated with photos of Bob Hope and his radio crew, Jolson, and some composite images that give a feel for the broadcast.     This is an excerpt of the 07 Apr 1947 Lux Radio Theatre production of "Alexander's Ragtime Band," with Al Jolson. Although not in the movie upon which this one hour radio drama is based, Al Jolson lent his particular talents with Irving Berlin's music to this adaptation, playing himself. Within this excerpt you will hear Jolson sing "Alexander's Ragtime Band," "Lazy," and "A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody." Along with three Jolson songs, there are original images from the program of the cast and newspaper, including the revelation of a cast change just before the broadcast.

   
This is an excerpt of the 02 Apr 1947 Bing Crosby Program with Al Jolson and John Charles Thomas. This excerpt is the last segment of the show, which was structured as an old time minstrel show. Enjoy a rare radio rendition of Al Jolson singing "My Mammy," and Jolson, Crosby, and Thomas with "Alabamy Bound." Illustrating the video are photos, with some manipulation, and period pieces from the program.     This is an excerpt of the 02 Apr 1945 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of Swanee River. This radio adaptation of the movie biography of songwriter Stephen Foster featured Al Jolson as E.P. Christie, and Dennis Morgan as Stephen Foster. Included in this podcast are two songs from the hour broadcast, "Oh, Susannah!" and "April Showers." It is illustrated with some scenes from the movie, as well as original and composite photographs of the stars on the radio.

   
This is an excerpt of the 04 Mar 1949 Jimmy Durante program with guest star Al Jolson. In this edited excerpt from the end of the show, Durante and Alan Young plan to bring Jolson into their music publishing business. There is plenty of business, with snippets of songs by both Durante and Jolson, ending with the wonderful "Real Piano Player." There are photos of Durante and Young, as well as Durante, Jolson, and the new tape recording tape used for the first time in this broadcast.     This is an excerpt of the 29 Mar 1950 Burns and Allen program with guest star Al Jolson. There is no reason to delve into the plot of this program, as the madcap comedy of Burns and Allen would not resurface until "Laugh In" decades later, but suffice it to say that this edited clip of the show includes George and Gracie, along with Al Jolson and "Easter Parade." Enjoy looking at photos of the stars to help you get a feel for the broadcast, as well.

   
This is an excerpt of the 06 Mar 1947 Eddie Cantor program with guest star Al Jolson. Here is Al Jolson singing two songs not elsewhere recorded, both associated with Eddie Cantor. Although Jolson introduced "If You Knew Susie," it was Cantor who popularized it, and "Ida, Sweet As Apple Cider" was sung by Eddie as a tribute to his wife. Here's Jolie doing both, along with comments from Cantor. Along with a photo of the pair from the late 1940s, there is an article from Variety describing this show and the one the day before, which was featured on the site last week.     This is an excerpt of the 05 Mar 1947 Bing Crosby program with guest star Al Jolson. This is a little clip from the show, with Bing and Al singing Jolson's classic "Who Paid The Rent For Mrs. Rip Van Winkle When Rip Van Winkle Went Away?" Photos of Bing and Al on the radio complete the experience. Of course, they do it better than I could describe!

   
This is an excerpt of the 25 Jan 1936 Al Jolson Shell Chateau with guest star Cab Calloway. In this sample of the show, Al Jolson introduces Cab Calloway and his band, who perform "One Of These Days." Following that, and some banter, Al Jolson recalls a performance in the famous Cotton Club, and sings "I Can't Give You Anything But Love." Of course, there are great pictures of both Al and Cab to illustrate.     This is an excerpt of the 20 Feb 1947 Burns and Allen Show, with guest star Al Jolson. As always, this video treat is illustrated with photographs of the stars, both original and composite, to give a flavor for the broadcast. In this portion of the show, enjoy the comedy of George Burns and Gracie Allen, and Al Jolson singing "I'm Sitting On Top Of The World," and "April Showers." The latter rendition is unlike any other Jolie ever recorded.

   
This is an excerpt of the 16 Feb 1948 Lux Radio version of The Jolson Story, starring Al Jolson. Al Jolson played himself in the radio adaptation of his fictionalized film biography. In this brief excerpt of the one hour broadcast, you can hear William Demarest narrating, while Al Jolson sings "Ma Blushin' Rosie," "Toot, Toot, Tootsie," and "My Mammy." I have illustrated this podcast with some scenes from the movie, some candid shots of the actors, and some classic shots of Jolson, himself.     This is an excerpt of the 15 Feb 1950 Bing Crosby Show, with guest star Al Jolson. Enjoy a great rendition of "California, Here I come," followed by some Crosby and Jolson banter, and concluded with a duet of "Bye, Bye, Baby." Period photos of Mr. Jolson and Mr. Crosby help give a feel for the look of this broadcast.

   
This is an excerpt of the 01 Feb 1950 Burns and Allen Show, with guest star Al Jolson. This segment of the show concerns Gracie Allen's efforts to find out just what keeps Jolson so young looking. Enjoy the comedy segment with Gracie and Al, followed by a great rendition of "Toot, Toot, Tootsie." The video is illustrated with photos, original and composite, of the stars.     This is an excerpt of the 26 Jan 1943 Al Jolson Colgate Program. The podcast begins with the opening of the show, and Al Jolson's performance of "I'm Going Back To The Shack Where The Black-Eyed Susans Grow." Following the song, Jolie delivered some scripted World War II vintage humor, and talked about his new co-host, Monty Woolley. We then hear Carol Bruce, the "girl Singer" of the show, with "Basin Street Blues." The video is illustrated with photos, original and composite, of the stars.

   
This is an excerpt of the 19 Jan 1943 Al Jolson Colgate Program. This program was dedicated to the War effort, and the podcast is Jolson's closing monologue and song, "There'll Never Be Another War." This video is illustrated with photographs of Al Jolson on Colgate, and Al Jolson at the front during World War II.     This is an excerpt of the 12 Jan 1943 Al Jolson Colgate Program. Humorist Robert Benchley joined Al Jolson on this program, along with the regulars. Here is some of the comedy routine between Benchley and Jolson, followed by Benchley's introduction of Jolson's classic hit, "Sonny Boy." This video is illustrated with original and composite photographs of Mr. Jolson and Mr. Benchley.

   
This is an excerpt of the 05 Jan 1943 Al Jolson Colgate Program. This is the opening of the program, featuring Al Jolson singing "I'm Sitting On Top Of the World," and some strained topical comedy, illustrated with photos of announcer Fred Uttal and Al Jolson.     This is an excerpt of the 25 Dec 1948 broadcast of Two Hours of Stars, featuring Al Jolson. This is the beginning of a two hour program which featured a host of stars. In this podcast, you will hear Lauritz Melchoir open with a song, followed by some comedy material with Al Jolson, and Mr. Jolson singing "I'm Sitting On Top Of The World." Photos include announcer Ken Carpenter, master of ceremonies Don Ameche, Lauritz Melchoir and Al Jolson.

   
This is an excerpt of the 17 Dec 1946 broadcast of the Amos and Andy show, featuring Al Jolson. This is an edited segment of Jolson's appearance on this popular radio show, placed to plug the Jolson biopic, The Jolson Story. The audio from the show is enhanced with photos of Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, and Al Jolson from the broadcast.     This is an excerpt of the 16 Dec 1939 broadcast of the opening of the Arrowhead Springs Resort. In this clip, Al Jolson sings "California, Here I Come" in a unique arrangement, with a chorus, verse, and two choruses. This is the only time Jolson recorded the song this way, and the audience reaction speaks to their approval. It is, of course, illustrated with period photos of Al Jolson and others.

   
This is an excerpt of the 07 Dec 1935 broadcast of the NBC Radio Studio dedication, featuring Al Jolson. This is a brief sample of the two hour broadcast, of which about an hour and a quarter survive, and includes Al Jolson singing "Cantor on the Sabbath," and is illustrated with photos of Al Jolson singing on the radio in 1935.     This is an excerpt of the 30 Nov 1949 Bing Crosby Program with guest star Al Jolson. Along with the great songs sung by Bing, Al Jolson joined the program with a few songs, including the two in this podcast. Enjoy Jolie singing and whistling "Toot, Toot, Tootsie," and Al and Bing in a duet with "Back In Your Own Backyard" while looking at pictures of Bing and Al.

   
This is an excerpt of the 23 Nov 1948 broadcast of "This Is Your Life," honoring Ada Nelligan, a wardrobe mistress whose years in the entertainment industry were marked with the program. This is the Jolson segment of the program, recalling Al Jolson's contact with Ms. Nelligan some 23 years previously. It is illustrated with a photograph from the broadcast and other images, and includes a brief chorus of "Hello 'Tucky," and a Jolson song not elsewhere recorded, "An Old Fashioned Girl In A Gingham Gown."     This is an excerpt of the 01 Nov 1938 Lifebuoy Program starring Al Jolson with guest Gov. Al Smith. This is the closing segment of the program, with Al Jolson going over old times with the former Governor of New York, Al Smith. Al Jolson concluded the segment with a rendition of "Avalon." The audio is illustrated with photos of Mr. Smith and Mr. Jolson, original and composite, to give a feel for the broadcast. This is, of course, just a sampling of the material in the half-hour radio show.

   
This is an excerpt of the 18 Oct 1938 Lifebuoy Program starring Al Jolson. This is a sample of the material in the half hour show, which also stars Martha Raye and Parkyakarkus, with guest stars Marie Wilson and Charles Butterworth. Al Jolson's songs, "Confidentially," and "When Day Is Done," are included for your enjoyment. Photos of Al Jolson from the Lifebuoy era give a feel for this broadcast. Within the program itself, on the Al Jolson Website, or available through the IAJS Audio Department, Jolson and Raye duet in "Sweet Georgia Brown," and several comic sketches are featured.     This is an excerpt of the 01 Oct 1936 Sears program Then and Now guest starring Al Jolson. Along with other stars of the day, Al Jolson appeared on this programs celebrating Sears 50th anniversary, and sang excerpts of his hits in a biographical fashion. He also put part of The Singing Fool on the radio, complete with "Sonny Boy." The segments are illustrated with photos and images of the material being described.

   
This is an excerpt of the 27 Oct 1946 Barry Gray Show with Guest Star Al Jolson. Al Jolson appeared on the late night talk show just after the opening of The Jolson Story, and for almost 90 minutes told stories of his life, joked, and sang. This ten minute video podcast contains three of the songs from that evening, Ma Blushin' Rosie, April Showers, and Swanee, augmented with a photo of the evening, and photos for some of the stories that Jolson told that night. There is, of course, much more in the whole program.     This is an excerpt of the 26 Oct 1949 Steve Allen show with guest star Al Jolson. Al Jolson's candid, unscripted, appearance during this 45 minute broadcast is only hinted by the sample included in this podcast, which is illustrated by pictures of the stars, augmented to illustrate the evening. Listen to him joke and interact with a very young Steve Allen, whose career was just starting, and thrill the audience with a performance of "California, Here I Come," with a long ovation in response.

   
This is an excerpt of the 01 Oct 1946 tribute broadcast to Al Jolson. This star-studded program originated from both New York and California, and included George Jessel, Eddie Cantor, Dinah Shore, Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Perry Como, and others, in an hour long tribute to the World's Greatest Entertainer upon the release of The Jolson Story. This podcast includes songs by Eddie Cantor, Dinah Shore, and Frank Sinatra, along with the ending of the program by Mr. Jolson, illustrated with pictures of the stars. If there is any doubt about how those in the business felt about Al Jolson, this should get rid of them for all time.     This is an excerpt of the 16 Sep 1950 Al Jolson performance at the Itazuke Air Force Base in Japan. This excerpt includes three songs from the half-hour transcription, which includes Jolson joking and singing for his favorite audience, soldiers at the front, and photographs of Al Jolson on that final tour. "Swanee," "April Showers," and "The Anniversary Song" are the three songs heard here, there is quite a bit more in the original program. This is likely the last transcribed performance of Al Jolson; he died about one month after this show.

   
This is an excerpt of the 16 Sep 1933 broadcast from Belmont Park with Al Jolson. Having wrapped one movie, starting another, and headlining on the radio, Al Jolson took time to go to Belmont Park in New York, and appear on the radio to joke and call a race at the track. This is just a race and a little humor, augmented by photos of Al Jolson, his father, and vintage pictures of Belmont Park.     This is an excerpt of the September 8, 1937, Memorial Concert to George Gershwin with George Jessel and Al Jolson, illustrated with pictures of the stars from the era, giving the flavor of the performance, as well as a photo of the actual concert in the Hollywood Bowl. This brief excerpt of the two hour program includes Jessel's eulogy of Gershwin, and Jolson's performance of Gershwin's first, and greatest, hit, "Swanee," which he sang without whistling.

   
This is an excerpt of the September 7, 1937, Lifebuoy Program starring Al Jolson with guest George Jessel, illustrated with pictures of the stars from the era, giving the flavor of the performance. This clip from the existing 16 minute transcription of the broadcast features Al Jolson and George Jessel having fun with "Toot, Toot, Tootsie."     This is an excerpt of the September, 1949, polio drive program in Baltimore, Maryland, featuring Al Jolson, illustrated with some scenes of Al Jolson and the era described in this broadcast In this edited segment, Jolson recalled his boyhood in Charm City, and sang "April Showers," accompanied by Harry Akst.

   
This is an excerpt of the August, 1942, Contact program starring Al Jolson, illustrated with some scenes of Al Jolson entertaining the troops, all over the world. This program, broadcast in support of the military during World War II, featured Al Jolson as Honorary Soldier of the Week. This excerpt includes some topical humor, along with his popular "California, Here I Come."     This is an excerpt of the 13 Aug 1941 Treasury Hour Program, featuring Al Jolson, and illustrated with images of the star and environment to get a feeling for the broadcast. Having just closed his last Broadway show, Al Jolson joined in this effort to sell Defense Bonds before World War II erupted. Here is an edited version of his closing segment, which suggests the plot of his life story, The Jolson Story, to be made five years later.

   
This is an excerpt of the 03 Aug 1938 Tribute to Irving Berlin featuring Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor and Irving Berlin, illustrated with images of the stars to get a feeling for the broadcast.. This one hour radio program was both a tribute to Berlin, and a plug for the new movie Alexander's Ragtime Band. Along with the many other stars in the show, enjoy three great stars singing great Berlin tunes.     This is an excerpt of the 08 Jun 1948 broadcast of The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Program with guest star Al Jolson, and illustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. Al Jolson took note of the 34th anniversary of Eddie and Ida Cantor being wed, and sang a song to them as only he could.

   
This is an excerpt of the 23 Jul 1944 broadcast of Your All Time Hit Parade, starring Tommy Dorsey with guest star Al Jolson, and illustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. Recovering from illness contracted while entertaining the troops in World War II, Al Jolson appeared on just this program during the summer of 1944. Singing two songs, one of which, "April Showers," is featured in this video podcast, he continued the work he started to maintain the morale of our fighting men and women. Harry von Zell is also featured on this broadcast.     This is an excerpt of the 16 Jul 1940 broadcast from Arlington Park with Al Jolson, illustrated with images of Al Jolson at the track, alone and with others, throught the years. Appearing in Chicago promoting his last Broadway show then in preview, Al Jolson took time to call a race at the track. This is just the race, there is much more in the ten minute program.

   
This is an excerpt of the 12 Jul 1937 Tribute to George Gershwin, featuring Al Jolson, and illustrated with images of Al Jolson on NBC from the era. This was one of two numbers performed by Al Jolson on a radio tribute broadcast the evening following George Gershwin's death.     This is an excerpt of the June, 1935, Go Into Your Dance radio promotion starring Al Jolson with Ruby Keeler. This is a brief clip from a ten minute radio spot for the Jolson - Keeler flick, which was then premiering all over the country, illustrated with stills from the movie's promotion. Enjoy Jolson singing "Mammy, I'll Sing About You," then go watch the movie!

   
This is an excerpt of the 04 Jun 1941 Eddie Cantor Program with guest star Al Jolson, illustrated with images of the stars augmented a bit for this program. Jolie did not sing a lot of songs during this great show, but this tribute to Eddie Cantor's wife is a singular gem.     This is an excerpt of the 15 Jun 1936 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of Burlesque, featuring Al Jolson and Ruby Keeler, illustrated with images of the stars. This segment features Al Jolson singing three songs from the program, some comedy scripted between Jolson and Keeler, and even some of Ruby's tap dancing.

   
This is an excerpt of the 11 Jun 1937 Hollywood Hotel, featuring Al Jolson and George Jessel, and illustrated with images of the stars, real and enhanced, to get a feeling for the broadcast. This segment features Jolson singing an earlier version of "Ma Blushin' Rosie" than the one familiar from The Jolson Story, and Jolson and Jessel doing a duet of "Give My Regards To Broadway."     This is an excerpt of the 06 Jun 1945 Milton Berle Show, featuring Al Jolson with biographical musical vignettes of his life, and illustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. Having just recovered from the loss of much of a lung, Jolson's appearance between V-E Day and V-J Day was a poignant look at the World's Greatest Entertainer in a fragile time of his life. Listen to his words about racial and ethnic tolerance, so moving from a man often painted as a racist.

   
This is an excerpt of the 02 Jun 1947 Lux Radio Theatre, starring Al Jolson in a radio adaptation of The Jazz Singer, llustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. Along with Jolson, the production starred Ludwig Donath, Tamara Shayne, and Gail Patrick. This edited clip features a smattering of dialog from the program, along with Al Jolson singing "Toot, Toot, Tootsie," "Keep Smiling At Trouble," and "I'm Sitting On Top Of The World."     This is an excerpt of the 26 May 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Groucho Marx, illustrated with images of the stars to get a feeling for the broadcast. This was Al Jolson's final broadcast as host of the Kraft Music Hall, and it happened to be his birthday as well. He sang the great Cole Porter song, "Why Can't You Behave?" from Kiss Me Kate. With Groucho he engaged in the usual comedy banter, which includes what may be the longest set up for a joke in radio history.

   
This is an excerpt of the 12 May 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Victor Moore, illustrated with images of the stars to get a feeling for the broadcast.. Jolson and Moore join in some typical radio comedy, and end the routine in a duet of "Pretty Baby." After that, you can hear Al Jolson solo in the great song from South Pacific, "Some Enchanted Evening."     This is an excerpt of the 19 May 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Dorothy Kirsten, illustrated with images of the stars to get a feeling for the broadcast. Ms. Kirsten leads the segment with an operatic aria befitting her status with the Metropolitan Opera. Following that, she and Jolson banter about a bit with the subject of opera. Jolson and Kirsten end the segment with a great rendition of "People Will Say We're In Love."

   
This is an excerpt of the 28 Apr 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Doris Day, illustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. In this edited segment, Al Jolson sings "You'll Always Be Beautiful" and "That Wonderful Girl Of Mine," Doris Day and Al Jolson do a great duet, and there is a comedy segment with Ken Carpenter and Oscar Levant featuring the usual assortment of blown lines and gags.     This is an excerpt of the 05 May 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Dennis Day, illustrated with images of the stars, real and composite, to get a feeling for the broadcast. In this edited segment, Dennis Day shows his talent for dialect, and even a little Yiddish, as he paired with Al Jolson in a comdey routine, capped off with a duet of "By The Light Of The Silvery Moon." Al Jolson finished the segment with a rarely heard tribute to Mother's Day, "Remember Mother's Day."

   
This is an excerpt of the 14 Apr 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Margaret Whiting. The daughter of songwriter Richard Whiting, Margaret joins Al in two duets along with a turn of her own in this edited portion of the broadcast.     This is an excerpt of the 21 Apr 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Jimmy Durante. In this edited segment, Jolson and Durante explore the possibility of a world tour, aided by the acting skills of Oscar Levant. They end the segment with a great version of "Real Piano Player."

   
This is an excerpt of the 30 Mar 1943 Al Jolson Colgate program. Although only part of this show survives, the closing song was this one, dedicated to the American soldier. It is just as meaningful today as it was when performed, during the height of the Second World War.     This is an excerpt of the 07 Apr 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Groucho Marx. Groucho tries valiantly to sell Al Jolson a baseball team, and the two conclude the segment with a duet of "That Little German Band."

   
This is an excerpt of the 17 Mar 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. Roy Rogers and Dale Evans join Al Jolson and Oscar Levant in a fanciful look at a western movie. Rogers and Evans sing "San Anton." And the video podcast concludes with an extra song not in the audio version, Jolson singing "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows."     This is an excerpt of the 24 Mar 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with George Jessel. George Jessel joined Al Jolson and Oscar Levant in a series of jokes and personal recollections, capped by a recreation of an old time minstrel show.

   
This is an excerpt of the 03 Mar 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Oscar Levant and guest star Phil Harris. Harris brought Frank Remley, played by Elliott Lewis, as a guitar player who was looking for a job. After the comedy, Jolson sang Irving Berlin's "Remember."     This is an excerpt of the 10 Mar 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Jimmy Durante. After a singinging entrance, Al and Jimmy's edited comedy routine features Al Jolson singing "I Was Born In Virginny" and "Mary Is A Grand Old Name," by George M. Cohan, and Al and Jimmy duet in an extended version of Durante's classic "A Song's Gotta Come From The Heart."

   
This is an excerpt of the 17 Feb 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Oscar Levant and guest star Joan Davis. During this segment, Al and Joan do a comedy routine, and Jolson finishes with a song.     This is an excerpt of the 24 Feb 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson with Oscar Levant and guest star The Andrews Sisters. During this segment, Al Jolson and The Andrews Sisters sing two songs, "Way Down Yonder In New Orleans" and "Sonny Boy."

   
This is an excerpt of the 03 Feb 1949 Kraft Music Hall starring Al Jolson. Dennis Day was the guest on this week's program, and this podcast is from the middle part of the show, and features Al Jolson and Dennis Day in song and comedy. Along with the jokes, enjoy Day with "A Little Bird Told Me That You Love Me," and Jolson singing "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling."     This is an excerpt of the 10 Feb 1949 Kraft Music Hall, starring Al Jolson, with guest star Peggy Lee. During this segment, Al and Peggy join voices to make some beautiful music.

   
This is an excerpt of the 20 Jan 1949 Kraft Music Hall starring Al Jolson. Victor Moore was the guest on this week's program, but this podcast is from the middle part of the show, and features Jolson, Oscar Levant, Ken Carpenter, and Lou Bring. Enjoy the scripted comedy, with some discussion about little Asa, Jr. After that, Jolie gave out with "If You Were The Only Girl In The World." Then, you heard it first in The Jazz Singer, but here is a complete rendition of "Blue Skies." And after a little more schtick, "Someone Else May Be There While I'm Gone."     This is an excerpt of the 27 Jan 1949 Kraft Music Hall starring Al Jolson. Arthur Treacher was the guest on this week's program, but this podcast is from the middle part of the show, and features Jolson, Oscar Levant, and Lou Bring. Enjoy the scripted comedy, which refers to Jolson giving a party, and Jolson's renditions of "Carolina In The Morning," and "I Got Lucky In The Rain," from a contemporary show.

   
This is an excerpt of the 06 Jan 1949 Kraft Music Hall starring Al Jolson. Larry Parks was the guest on this week's program, but this podcast is from the middle part of the show, and features Jolson, Oscar Levant, Ken Carpenter, and Lou Bring. Enjoy the scripted comedy, which refers to the cast's expenses with the show broadcasting remotely from Palm Springs, and Jolson's renditions of "I Want A Girl Just Like The Girl That Married Dear Old Dad," "Don't Let It Get You Down," and "Ma Blushin' Rosie, Ma Posie Sweet."     This is an excerpt of the 13 Jan 1949 Kraft Music Hall starring Al Jolson. Groucho Marx was the guest on this week's program, but this podcast is from the middle part of the show, and features Jolson, Oscar Levant, Ken Carpenter, and Lou Bring. Enjoy the scripted comedy, which refers to Levant wanting to leave the show, and Jolson's renditions of "I'm Crying Just For You," and "She's A Latin From Manhattan," which has a Velveeta ending!

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This listing and material Copyright © 1995-2017 Marc I. Leavey, M.D. Baltimore, Maryland
Updated 23 Apr 17